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General Information

Bali

Bali is a land that seems to have a magnet at its very heart. It is a feeling that is difficult to understand unless experienced but once visited you are surely compelled to come back and you may even want to stay forever, such is its pull. Maybe its Balis beauty, maybe the friendly people, or maybe even the influence from spirits that certainly abide in this place.

Bali goes under many names. Some call it the island of the gods, others Shangri-La. The last paradise, the dawning of the world and the centre of the universe are yet more names for this truly beautiful tropical island inhabited by a remarkably artistic people who have created a dynamic society with unique arts and ceremonies.

Bali goes under many names. Some call it the island of the gods, others Shangri-La. The last paradise, the dawning of the world and the centre of the universe are yet more names for this truly beautiful tropical island inhabited by a remarkably artistic people who have created a dynamic society with unique arts and ceremonies.

Daily life on Bali is culturally linked to satisfying and appeasing the gods, spirits and demons in the midst of breathtaking panoramas of cultivated rice terraces, impressive volcanoes and pristine beaches. Balis main volcano, Gunung Agung, is still active and sometimes explosive and is considered sacred among local people as it is believed to be the centre of the universe.

Lying just 8o south of the Equator, Bali can boast a tropical climate with just two seasons a year and an average temperature of around 28o Celsius. It has a whole range of different environments and activities for the tourist, many of which are covered in these homepages.

Economically and culturally, Bali is one of the most important islands of Indonesia. Rice is grown on irrigated, terraced hillsides; other crops include sugar cane, coffee, copra, tobacco, fruits and vegetables. Cattle and hogs are also raised. The Balinese are skilled artisans, particularly in woodcarving and in fashioning objects of tortoiseshell and of gold, silver and other metals. The Balinese are noted for their traditional dance, the distinctive music of the gamelan and for their skills in weaving cloth of gold and silver threads, Songket, as well as for embroidering silk and cotton clothing.

Bali of today is one of the twenty six provinces of the Republic of Indonesia, divided administratively between eight districts that take their names and boundaries from the islands old Hindu kingdoms.

Bail Location

Bali is one of the Indonesian islands, located just 8 degrees from the equator. Bali Island is situated at the western end of Lesser Sunda Island between Java and Lombok. Bali is one of the provinces of Indonesia, with its capital city in Denpasar. The total area of Bali is about 5,78006 square kilometers (2.231 square miles).

Bali's population numbers over 4 million over 90 percent of whom adhere to Balinese Hinduism, though the rest of Indonesia is a highly Islamic nation. Minority religions on the island are Islam and Christianity. The largest ethnic groups on Bali are Balinese, Javanese, Baliaga, and Madurese.

Bali has a developed cultural scene with sculpture, painting, traditional dances, metalworking, music, and leather work, and for this the reason that Bali is the biggest tourist destination in Indonesia.


Bail Weather

During the dry season which is between the months of April and September, Bali receives the most visitors and temperatures are if at all only a tiny bit higher than during the other months. During Bali’s dry season one can still expect occasional rainfall though and sometimes even the locals are surprised how dry a rainy season can be and how rainy a dry season can be. During rainy season which is typically from October to March Bali becomes more quiet. Bali’s central mountain area is typically cooler and also more rainy than the lower coastal areas. Especially at night temparatures can drop to 15 degrees in certain areas higher up near the volcanos. The southern peninsula Bukith has less rain than the rest of south of Bali (Kuta, Legian, Seminyak, Denpasar). Have a look at the climate table for Denpasar, which gives you an idea about high and low temperatures during the day and the expected rainfall during dry season and rainy season:

Climate and Rainfall on Bali

Bali’s is located very near to the equator, therefore its warm, tropical climate makes it a huge draw for tourists. Average year-round temperature stands at around 30°C with a humidity level of about 85%. Generally one can say that Bali is pleasant all year through. Even if it rains, Bali is enjoyable. Particularly for some surfers who enjoy big waves some months during rainy season are more suitable. The two seasons are not clear cut and fully predictable. At times, a week in November on Bali can feel like a June and the other way around. Christmas and New Year is clearly high or peak season on Bali and tourists come from all over the world to enjoy the beaches, the surfing, diving, the restaurants, the club, the spas and everything else Bali has to offer – although it is technically “rainy season”. What to wear and AC on Bali The high temperatures combined with the high humidity is not easy for some, as also during the night the temperatures do not drop too much. At the coast this is not too bad because of the nice and fresh breeze from the sea. Most tourists enjoy air conditioned hotel rooms or at least use fans to cool down the rooms. Not considering any dress codes for classy restaurants or dinner parties we suggest loose summer clothes such as shorts, t-shirts, wide blouses and thin linen trousers. Men can get around with decent shorts and a shirt almost everywhere, even in the expensive clubs. Women in dresses have no problems anywhere but in the temples, where long sleaves and a sarong must be worn. In a way it is always summer on Bali…and yes…sun protection is a must if you are not used to the intense sun of the tropics.


Indonesia Travel Information (Korean)

Indonesia Travel Information (English)

ISGMA2016 Secretariat  Byeong Kwon Lee (secretariat@isgma.org) TEL: 82-2-518-0722 / FAX: 82-2-518-2937
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